Italian Man Resident In Ireland Admits Killing His Landlord And Eating His Heart

A 36-YEAR-OLD Italian man, Saverio Bellante, has admitted to killing his landlord in Dublin following a row over a game of chess before removing and eating part of his heart according to a report in Irishnews.com

The Sicilian native admitted the killing last year but pleaded not guilty to the murder of 39-year-old Tom O’Gorman at Beech Park Avenue, Castleknock last January.

The jury at the Central Criminal Court was told it will have to consider if he was suffering from a mental disorder at the time and can therefore be found not guilty by reason of insanity.

The body of Mr O’Gorman, a journalist and and Iona Institute researcher, was discovered at his home in the early hours of January 12 last year.
The 39-year-old had suffered head injuries, as well as stab wounds to the head, neck and chest.

At the trial it was heard that Mr Bellante and Mr O’Gorman had met through an international religious group.
He began renting a room in Mr O’Gorman’s house in November 2013.

The court was told that he had been diagnosed with a mental disorder but had been advised to slowly come off his anti-psychotic medication. He stopped taking the medication on January 9.

Mr Bellante called gardaí at 1.50am on January 12 and told them he had killed Mr O’Gorman with a dumbbell and a knife.

He said the killing was linked to a row over a chess game.

Prosecution lawyer Patrick Gageby told the court that gardaí who found the body noticed an “enormous amount of blood” and “unusually a cutting open of the front of the chest”.

He said it appeared part of Mr O’Gorman’s lung had been cut out and brought to the kitchen.

Mr Bellante told gardaí he killed Mr O’Gorman and then decided it was better to remove his heart.

He told them he removed it with his hands, that it was in two pieces, big and small, and that he ate the big piece but left the smaller piece on a dish in the kitchen because “it wasn’t for me”.

Clinical forensic psychiatrist at the Central Mental Hospital, Dr Stephen Monks, told the court that a doctor told Mr Bellante to come off anti-psychotic medication gradually and that he stopped on January 9.

He said Mr Bellante told him he started to feel unwell the next day, the day before the murder.

He said Mr Bellante began to interpret things as good and evil and told him that he was watching a football match and saw it as a battle between good and evil.

He said after he had played the chess game with Mr O’Gorman on January 11, he believed his landlord was on the side of evil because he did not respect the rules of the game.

The trial continues.